A note for the composer!

Always nice to get a note such as this!

“Hello Tom,

I just wanted to thank you for all the fine editing you did on my compositions.
It looks all very nice.
Best wishes for 2018 !!

Chiel Meijering”

I had the pleasure of recording some of Chiel Meijering’s works at Auer Hall on Oct. 28th, 2017. Very enjoyable music to listen to, and great performances by soloist Kathleen McLean on bassoon!

The most rewarding thing about my work at Sweet Owen Sound is getting to hear music and performances like these. If you’ve found this post I hope you will go ahead and listen to these recordings. You can watch Perpetuate Transmigration here or watch Star Pulse here! I hope you enjoy these as much as I do!

Starpulse

Kathleen McLean, Associate Professor of Bassoon at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music is the soloist in the premiere performance of “Starpulse” by Chiel Meijering. The composer attended the performance in Auer Concert Hall on Oct. 28th, 2017. The concert included an Indiana University Student String Orchestra directed by David Jang.

In this performance one of North America’s most acclaimed orchestral bassoonists plays a work by one of the Netherlands most performed composer. For more information on the soloist and composer you can read the concert program HERE!.

To visit Kathleen McLean’s website Click Here! To visit Chiel Meijering’s website Click Here!

You can view the performance on YouTube in HD Click Here!. If you are using a mobile device you may want to watch the embeded video below.

Sweet Owen Sound recorded and produced this video on behalf the artists and thanks them for their permission to post it here!

Perpetuate Transmigration

Kathleen McLean, Associate Professor of Bassoon at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music performs “Perpetuate Transmigration” by Chiel Meijering. The composer attended the performance on Oct. 28th, 2017 which included an Indiana University Student String Orchestra directed by David Jang. Audio and video recording by Sweet Owen Sound Recording Studio, Spencer IN.

This is an amazing piece of music by Chiel Meijering and a great performance by Kathleen McLean. It seems to capture the attention of everyone I’ve played it for in the studio. I hope you will enjoy it as well.

The embedded link below will play well on mobile devices, otherwise you can see this video in HD : HD Video at YouTube!

Here is a link to the Recital Program which includes notes on Kathleen McLean and Chiel Meijering as well a the names of the student orchestra members.

For more information visit Prof. McLean’s website www.kmbassoon.com or the composer’s website www.chielmeijering.com.

July 2017

As my birthday was approaching, thoughts about how I would like to celebrate the day settled on taking pictures of our dogs and recording “I Can See Clearly” My thinking was clear, you can never have enough good pictures of your dogs, and it was time to record this song:Sound Cloud, Tom Yeiser, I Can See Clearly Now.

About the song

Johnny Nash’s “I Can See Clearly Now” is and has been a favorite song. It helped introduce Reggae to the U.S. in 1972 and is one of those iconic vocals that is hard to forget. The chord changes in the bridge were pretty cool and the use of accordion and hand percussion introduced my ears to world music.

Rambling production notes

I wanted to take inventory of where my music skills are today. I spent some time learning the bass part and drum part the way I used to learn songs when I was playing in bands in the 70’s and 80’s. I think I’ve continued getting better at figuring things out, so that is something to be thankful for. I love how this bass line locked with the kick drum. It is hard for a song to groove without the groove.

It is probably a bad idea to pick a song to cover with a vocal that is as stylized and perfect as this one is. I am not a great singer, although I am happy to report that auto-tunish software played no part in this recording and digital intervention in general was kept to a minimum. It is a pretty old fashioned recording in that respect. The key of E is not great for me either and as the years stack up the top end of my voice is disappearing. Anyway, despite it all I like the vocal, it is where I’m at.

Greg Mongolds’ Mossman guitar is heard on this track. I hadn’t realized until a moment ago when I checked the tag in the sound hole that it was built in 1972. I guess I can feel like there has been some synchronicity at work here. I think the guitar and the solo sit in the track pretty well. Pop song scholars will note that I added the solo and repeated the bridge. It’s a tuff song and I think it can take it.

I’m not sure if it is a quirk or a foible, but I’m not fond of pop song fade outs. I worked out a clean end and could see clearly how that messed up the song. So as I’m fading out, it probably is OK to let this track fade out too.

The synthesizer horn part in the bridge was the thing that was shocking to my ears back in 72. It reminds me of the first synthesizer I ever really heard and played which was an Arp Odyssey that Conrad and Sons Music loaned to New Albany High School in 1975 for our production of “Jesus Christ Superstar”. We were the second High School in the U.S. to put the show on, and part of the production costs were paid for with money from the National Endowment for the Arts. My sincere thanks to the generation of parents that paid taxes and didn’t mind enriching the lives of kids at my High School, and my thanks to a music department that could put on something that was kind of controversial at the time. Well done.

I’ll will eventually get back on the topic, but I played bass in Superstar, and even though there were lots of pictures of the show in my Senior Year Book, not one photo of the band was included.

Returning to “I Can See Clearly Now” the synthesizer part now seems a bit too prominent. While it was way out at the time it is a bit dated and the incredible vocals are kind of too far back in my opinion.

Bringing this to a close

I hope Beth and I will get around to doing another photo shoot of our dogs because I know I will treasure those as long as I live. What I learned spending time with this song, the process of recording, and producing something I like to hear was a good way to mark a birthday.

Finally I saw some press about Johnny Nash last year, he was alive (I hope he still is) and doing some studio work. This song was kind of a departure from his earlier work, which I don’t know very well, if at all. But this song was interesting to me. Let’s see Nixon won re-election in 72, Vietnam and Watergate were dominating the news, I spent the summer in Bloomington.

I Can See Clearly Now

As my birthday was approaching recently, thoughts about how I would like to celebrate the day settled on taking pictures of our dogs and recording “I Can See Clearly”  My thinking was clear, you can never have enough good pictures of your dogs, and it was time to record this song.

You can hear/download the track on my SoundCloud account “Tom Yeiser”. Here is a link: Sound Cloud, Tom Yeiser, I Can See Clearly Now.

About the song

Johnny Nash’s “I Can See Clearly Now” is and has been a favorite song. It helped introduce Reggae to the U.S. in 1972 and is one of those iconic vocals that is hard to forget. The chord changes in the bridge were pretty cool and the use of accordion and hand percussion (bongos I’m guessing) introduced my ears to world music after a steady diet of two guitars a bass and drums.

Rambling production notes

With the number of years piling up I wanted to take inventory of where my skills are today. Even though I’ve played the song for years I spent the time to learn the bass part and drum part the way I used to learn songs when I was playing in cover bands in the 70’s and 80’s. I’m probably quite a bit better now than I was back then, so that is something to be thankful for. I love how this bass line locked with the kick drum. It is hard for a song to groove without the groove.

I realize that picking a song to cover that Johnny Nash sang is probably a bad idea. I am happy to report that auto-tunish pitch correction type of software played no part in this recording and digital intervention was kept to a minimum. It is a pretty old fashioned recording in many respects. All in all I like the vocal, despite age taking it’s toll it’s real and it’s where I’m at.

I played my friend Greg Mongolds’ Mossman guitar which was built in 1972.  I hadn’t realized until a moment ago that the guitar was built the year this song was on the radio. I guess I can feel like there has been some synchronicity at work here. I think the guitar and the solo sit in the track pretty well, even though the Mossman’s voice would have have liked a new set of strings. Pop song scholars will note that I added the solo and repeated the bridge.

I’m not sure if it is a quirk or a foible, but I’m not fond of pop song fade outs like Johnny Nash’s version has so I worked out a clean end. It didn’t take long to see clearly how that messed up the song.  So I let this track fade out too.

The synthesizer horn part in the bridge was the thing that was shocking to my ears back in 72. It reminds me of the first synthesizer I got to play with. It was an Arp Odyssey that Conrad and Sons Music loaned to New Albany High School in 1975 for our production of “Jesus Christ Superstar”. I played bass guitar in the production. We were the second High School in the U.S. put the show on, and I’m pretty sure the high school received some grant money from the National Endowment for the Arts. My sincere thanks to that generation of parents who paid taxes and enriched the lives of kids at my High School. Also my thanks to a music department that could put on something that was kind of a reach. Incorporating a rock and roll ensemble into the pit band and doing the Andrew Loyd Weber play about Jesus were both kind of controversial at the time. Well done.

I’ll will eventually get back on the topic, but I was amazed when my High School Year book came out and even though there were lots of pictures of the show, there was not one photo of the band included. The B3, the Arp, the Steinway, the Bassman amp, the telecatser. the showman amp, the strings and horns, and a dozen or highschool musicians who really stepped up were left out.

Returning to “I Can See Clearly Now” the synthesizer part now seems a bit too prominent. While it was far out at the time it sounds a bit dated and the incredible vocals are kind of too far back in the mix in my opinion.

Bringing this to a close

I hope Beth and I will get around to doing another photo shoot of our dogs, because I know I will treasure those as long as I live. What I learned spending time with this song, the process of recording, and producing something I like to hear was a good way to mark a birthday.

Finally I saw some press about Johnny Nash last year, he was alive (I hope he still is) and doing some studio work. This song was kind of a departure from his earlier work, which I don’t know very well, if at all. But this song was interesting to me. Let’s see Nixon won re-election in 72, Vietnam and Watergate were dominating the news, I spent the summer in Bloomington.

Petar Jankovic Ensemble

The Petar Jankovic Ensemble (PJE) has performed all over the world! They have been featured on NPR’s Performance Today, and they recorded ‘from Spain to Tango’ at Sweet Owen Sound. Here is a link to some of the rave reviews it has received!

This recording was approached as a live studio recording. PJE played in the main studio as if they were performing on stage. Individual microphones were recording each instrument while multiple takes of each movement were recorded. Every edit was applied to every microphone in the take before a composite set of tracks representing each instrument was rendered. All mixing and production work was performed on the composite instrument tracks. While this is not the quickest or easiest way to edit a live multi-track recording it is an exquisite way to retain the live feel of a room recording and allow individual processing of each instrument input.

Nemanja Ostoich

Classical guitarist Nemanja Ostoich recorded his CD ‘first born‘ at Sweet Owen Sound.  This album features music by Barrios, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Morreno-Torroba, Bogdanović, Brouwer, and Koskin.

This album was produced by Tom Yeiser at Sweet Owen Sound, and it was a particular pleasure to read the great reviews (national and international) that the album received.

The recording was made using a Decca Tree and all of the editing was done on the original three tracks. A composite three track recording was rendered before any post production work was done. It was a detailed and time consuming way to work, but the end result was a great sounding album.

This recording was made on a guitar built by John H. Dick (builder information here) and featured a double top (sandwich top) which is faithfully reproduced in this recording. It was a powerful sounding guitar, trading some of the air and sparkle of a traditional solid top for the power and sustain of a sandwich top.

You can find more information about the album on the artist website.

Adam Cantor “2010 Hoosier Guitar Idol” records at Sweet Owen Sound, whoa….

Who would have thought such a high quality studio could be found in the heart of Owen County?  As I take a break from the process of editing the tracks we recorded yesterday, I reflect on what a perfect environment Sweet Owen Sound is for recording.  The studio is pristine and has an enormous selection of microphones.  Tom is extraordinarily pleasant to work with.  My album is entirely original fingerstyle acoustic guitar pieces.  Tom mic’d my guitar with four microphones, three on a deca tree (a ribbon and two condensers) and a mini shotgun condenser on my guitar.  These microphones make my guitar sound like a symphony, which is amazing.  Tom has been very flexible, and does a great job at leading me in the right direction in recording decisions, but at the same time he is open to my suggestions along the way.  He even offered to make a couple videos of my studio recordings free of charge.  I hope to be back at Sweet Owen Sound again down the road!

Adam Cantor

adamcantormusic.com

Adam Cantor photo